A School Site to Track Schedules, Assignments and Grades (Part II)

Guest Author: Trudy Hutzler

Welcome to part two of the School Site Overview.

In the last article I gave you some background about why we created the School Site, and I showed how we tracked classes. In this article we start to get into more of the fun stuff as I walk you through how we track homework and assignments.

The Home Page

Again starting on the Home Page, where we have used Easy Tabs version 5 to organize our data, I want to start with the “All Assignments” tab. Here is a list of all assignments that are due for the current quarter and their status.

This shows whether an assignment is submitted, late and by how many days, or how many days until it is due. To evaluate how many days till due, or late against the due date I used Christophe’s new Countdown/Countup formulas.

The priority of the assignment is indicated by the font color of the Assignment Title. I used the Color Coded Calendar tool from the SharePoint Users Toolkit for this piece and just tweaked it a little for my use.

The progress % is a visual indicator showing the percentage of the assignment that has been completed. It moves from Red to bright green as it moves across the bar. The actual color changes in 10% increments.

With online classes, it is not unusual to have classes with over 100 students, so as you can imagine it sometimes takes the teachers a while before they grade all those assignments and post the grades. Until they are all graded the assignment remains blank or at 0% making it hard to know if the assignment was submitted and being graded or was late. So we added the Submitted field so we as parents know if the assignment was submitted, and my daughter can be sure she didn’t forget to turn in the assignment after she completed her work, which if you have teenagers you know can happen a lot.

The Due Today and Due This Week tabs are pretty self-explanatory they are filter views of the Assignments list which list all assignments that are due. The image below shows the Due This Week tab.

The Late Assignments tab is another filtered view which gives us a list of all assignments that are past their due date, and have not been marked as submitted.

The List

As I said in my last article the Lists are the real work horse of the School Site and the Assignments List is really the nerve center for the whole site, everything else is just for support of this one list. In this list all homework assignments for the current quarter are tracked, and the grades recorded. We even track how many days until it is due, or how many days an assignment is late. We also provide access to any links needed to complete the assignment, and scheduled time for completing the work. It all happens here, and it all gets integrated from here as well.

Keeping track of the assignments is only one part of process; you also need to manage your time so that you can actually get the work done and submitted.  But as we all know clicking around between your to-do list and your calendar is a pain, even for the most disciplined of us, but especially for a teenager.  I knew if it wasn’t easy to move between assignment list and calendar and somehow tie the two together it wouldn’t be long before my daughter gave up and went back to her old tried and failed methods of doing her work.   So we needed to find a way to connect her Assignments list with the Schedule calendar.  You may remember the Schedule calendar from the last article.

This calendar color codes the entries by changing the background color according to the category you choose.  If you look at the figure above you will see some of the entries have a green background, another entry has a red background, and so on.  When you create a calendar entry there is a Category field where you can choose a category like “Holidays-No School” which would give the entry a green background and “Report Periods” which would give the entry a red background.  The category you choose will determine the background color of the calendar entry.

But that’s not all, if you call in and order in the next 30 minutes you will also receive the added feature of the Assignment List integration.  You can link your calendar event with an item in your assignment list by using a hyperlink that when clicked will open up the view list item dialog box from the Assignments list.

 Let’s say you are checking out your schedule in the calendar and see an assignment you are supposed to be working on, but can’t remember what it is you were supposed to do for the assignment.  If you open the calendar event, it will look something like the figure below.   You can now scroll down to the Assignment field and click on the hyperlink, which for this example is titled “Assignment 4”.  

This will open the View list item dialog box for this homework assignment from the Assignments list, which you can see in the figure below.  The Assignment List item will even open in a new window so you don’t have to navigate back to the Calendar page again. 

But wait that’s still not all, did you notice the Assignment Page link at the top of the calendar page?

Click that link and go straight to the All Tasks view of the Assignments List, as shown in the figure below.

The All Task, as seen above, is the default view for this list. Notice that in this view we are using the Title field that is linked to the edit dialog box. This gives us quick access to edit the item and update its information. We can easily see how much progress has been made on the assignment by the progress bar. If you click on any of the links in the Scheduled column it will open the dialog box for the calendar item associated with this assignment.

So if you need to reschedule your time to work on the assignment or extend it to another day you can do so easily from the list item itself without having to navigate away from the page. But what if no work time has been scheduled for this item yet? No problem, to schedule time to work on this item, simply select the assignment in the list, hover your mouse over the title of the item then click on the down arrow to open the drop down list item menu. There we have added a new action called Schedule Work using SharePoint designer.

Click on Scheduled work and you will be redirected to the Schedule Calendar where you can schedule time to complete this assignment. Then simply hit the back button on your browser, or click on the Assignments Page link at the top of the page to return to the Assignment list. Finally notice the last column Late Status, this is our newest addition to the site and is based on the Countdown/Countup Formulas Christophe debuted in his blog not long ago. Once I saw them I just had to have them, and Christophe was kind enough to let me beta test them. I of course altered them just a tiny bit to better fit my purposes. The formula you are seeing in this view is the system time formula; I will show you the Internet Time formula in just a little bit. I have used both for demonstration purposes.

So basically that is the list, I have used views to change the way the list looks and functions based on what I needed to accomplish. For example, to track late assignment I created the Late Assignment view that you saw on the Late Assignment tab on the home page. Or I have created a calendar view to show when each assignment is due on a calendar. Some views have a few more visual indicators, like the Details view.

I wanted to be able to see which assignments were more heavily weighted and therefore, should have a higher priority, but I didn’t want to add another column when I was already struggling to keep all the information from running together in a hodge podge. So I made a dual purpose field that would display the Title of the assignment and then color code its priority level by changing the color of the font. May not be real fancy, but it is effective.

Remember when I told you we would be seeing the Internet Time based countdown/countup formula later, well here is in the IsLate column. If you need to create more visual impact this is the one for you, it combines the countdown/countup information with an icon image to really get your attention. I also tweaked this formula a tiny bit to make it more suitable for my needs, mainly by changing the text.

As I have said before replace classes with projects, assignments with milestones, and grades for progress or performance indicators and you can see how these same concepts can be adapted to the business world.

In my next post I will cover how we track grades, because in the end it’s all about the grades.

Easy Tabs and accessibility

Adaptive Web Design is my topic of the day, with my RSS reader bringing me two articles on this theme: Responsive Layouts Using CSS Media Queries, by Kyle Schaeffer, and Now You See Me by Aaron Gustafson.

I am sure the Easy Tabs have a role to play in responsive layout, but today I’ll focus on the second article.

In this excerpt from his book, Aaron compares various methods to show and hide content – a standard pattern nowadays with tabbed interfaces, accordions and other widgets.

This gives me an opportunity to point out one of the changes I made to the Easy Tabs last year. In version 5, the show/hide behavior is now included in a stylesheet, in a class called “et-offscreen”. And the method I use is the one recommended by Aaron Gustafson: instead of changing the display to “none”, move the content off-screen. This way, users don’t see it anymore, but assistive technologies can still access it.

As we’re talking Web design, I should also mention that the Easy Tabs follow the progressive enhancement approach.

If you are not familiar with CSS, this post may just be as clear as mud. But the bottom line is that by adhering to the principles of accessibility and progressive enhancement, the Easy Tabs v5 are currently a solid solution to build tabbed interfaces.

A School Site to Track Schedules, Assignments and Grades (Part I)

Guest Author: Trudy Hutzler

Trudy currently works as a Senior Technical Architect for AT&T Hosting and Application Management, where she provides Windows Server and SharePoint support and administration.  She is also a contributing author for the new Mastering SharePoint Foundation 2010 book.

As a SharePoint Administrator I often get asked about adding visualizations and such to SharePoint to add that little something extra to the out of the box SharePoint experience.  As an avid follower of Path to SharePoint I find many of the solutions Christophe has provided are a great way to enhance the users SharePoint experience without requiring me, as the Administrator, to maintain a lot of code or customizations on the server.  As good as the solutions are on their own, when you begin to combine them and layer them you can create something that is user friendly and visually appealing.

To demonstrate this I am going to share with you a School Site that I created for my oldest daughter who attends school online.  Now obviously not everyone will have a need for a School Site to track classes, homework assignments, and grades, but if you replace classes with departments or projects, homework assignments with milestones or requirements, and grades with assessments or performance ratings, you can begin to see where this concept can be applied to many more business related activities.

To make this easier to follow I am going to break this down into several posts, the first few will be an overview of the site and what it looks like, and then later posts will cover how I created each part and tied them together.  When it is all said and done I hope to provide readers with a copy of my site, and all the formulas I used.  So let me start by giving you the nickel tour.

BACKGROUND

The high schools in our area are not all that great, so my oldest daughter attends a state chartered online school.  We love the way the classes themselves are conducted, but the homework and grade interface is difficult to navigate, confusing, and it is very easy to miss an important assignment simply because it is hidden deep in layers of folders.  After an entire year of missing and late assignments and a constant struggle to navigate the interface, my daughter came to me last summer and asked me to help her create a SharePoint site on my development farm I have at home that she could use instead.

What you are about to see is the current version of that site.  My daughter would like me to note that all names, classes, and grades have been changed to protect the innocent, and that no actual grades have been used in creating this demo.

This site is created on the Team Site template, and I am using SharePoint Foundation 2010, however most of the functionality will work on SharePoint 2007, with a few exceptions like calendar overlay which is only available with SharePoint 2010.

As we go through the series I will refer you back to the blog entries I used to create each feature, and make all of the formulas available.  I will also be adding them to a special document library I have added to the demo site which, with Christophe’s help, I hope to make a copy of the site available to the readers for their use.

ON THE HOME PAGE

The site itself has three main functions; track classes, track homework assignments, and track grades. In this post I will be walking through the parts of the site that we use to track classes.

For tracking classes, my daughter needed to know the days and times her classes were scheduled for and what each teachers fax number was for submitting work she was unable to submit in the drop boxes provided by the school.  She also needed to be able to keep control of her schedule by scheduling in time to do her assignments. As parents we needed to know when she was supposed to be attending her online classes, the name of her teachers and how to contact them if we had questions. We also needed to know when the grade periods started and ended, and when there was no school.  Most of all we needed a way for busy parents, as well as the student, to be able to track it all at a glance.  This is what we came up with.


 
On the home page of the school site we used Easy Tabs to create an easy way to organize and navigate through the information we wanted “at our finger tips”. Some of the views are for Mom and Dad’s information, others are for our daughter’s use, but it is all there in one spot.

This first tab “Class Calendar”, as seen above, is a view of her class schedule, but to make it even more informative we over laid her schedule and assignment calendar views to give it a more complete view.

Next we will look at the tabs pertaining to classes and schedules.  The Schedule tab, This Week tab, and the Today’s Schedule tab show a calendar view of the scheduled classes and events for the month, the week, or for the day.  This helps other family members know when she is busy attending her web classes and can’t be disturbed.  This actually comes in very handy on days when my other children have no school, like snow days, and they know when they need to be quiet and leave their Sister alone, however you can use something like this to tack meetings, or deadlines, schedule events, etc.

For this calendar we have added color coding so we can easily differentiate between scheduled classes, work time, and holidays.

The last tab is Print Preview click on one of the other tabs that you would like a printed version for, then click on the Print Preview tab and it will create a printer friendly view of that tab, click on your browsers print button to print.  Once you have printed out your page if you look at the Print Preview tab it now reads Back to Page.  Click on this tab and you will be returned to your regular view.

For us, this gives my daughter a printed copy to keep with her and refer to throughout the day, or a schedule to post of the refrigerator, or just a list of assignments to follow up on at the end of the day, but you can also use this feature to print out pages to add to a report or share with others who may not have access to your site.

LIBRARIES

We are using the Shared Documents library to keep copies of any downloaded forms, assignments, test, or home work she has written up and scanned to email to the teacher or upload to the Drop Box in the class web site.  This way if something doesn’t reach the teacher the work is handy and can be easily resubmitted.
She also has to keep an activity diary for PE, she didn’t want those getting mixed in with other assignments so we made a separate library for it.
Finally for this demonstration I added a third document library to hold text file copies of all the formulas and calculations used in creating this site.
                                             

 

LISTS

It is in the lists that the real action starts.  It is the Class Calendar, Assignments, Schedule, Contacts and Grades that are the real work horses for this site.  Since this post is all about organizing and tracking classes we will look at the Class Calendar and Contacts lists.

The Class Calendar is really just the Team Site Calendar renamed.  We added all her regularly scheduled classes in as events, and later over laid the Assignment Calendar, which is how my Daughter schedules in time to actually work on her assignments, to increase its impact and usefulness.


 
Next we needed to track information about the classes, teachers and contact information so we created a contact list.  We started with a basic contact list then removed fields that weren’t needed and were just cluttering up the place, and added a few custom fields till we got what we needed.


 
We kept the usual contact fields like First and Last Name, Phone Numbers, and such.  Then we edited the Category from your typical Work, Meeting, Phone Call, etc. to something more school oriented like Teacher, Advisor, School Staff, Student and Other.  Finally we added another Choice field and added in the name of her classes.

At this point my Daughter decided she needed a place to keep track of all her other dates and to schedule time to actual work on each assignment.  So we created another calendar called Schedule which, since it would track multiple types of events, we made into a color coded calendar.


 
This calendar color codes the entries by category.  When you create a calendar entry, along with all the usual fields like title, location, start and end time, all day event or reoccurring event check boxes you also have a category choice field.  The category you choose will determine the color of the calendar entry.


 
So now you can see how using calendar overlays, and color coded calendars, in conjunction with Easy Tabs can begin to create a very useful interface.  This same concept can easily be adapted to tracking projects, deadlines, meetings and other deliverables.  And you don’t have to be a code ninja to get the job done.

In my next post I will get into the real nitty gritty of what makes the School Site work when I show you how we are tracking, and scheduling homework and assignments.

Coming soon on Path to SharePoint

No post in more than a month, this had never happened since I started this blog in 2008! Yes, starting my new company, traveling across the US, and the tax return have taken their toll…

Mind you, the blog still remained very active, with more than a hundred comments posted in the past month. But now it’s about time I add new content. So what’s coming next?

My next tutorial will be about countdowns/countups. I already published a live demo in February. If you can’t wait, head out for the SharePoint User Toolkit, a first countdown-countup page is already posted there! (and remember to send me some feedback)

I am also working on the Easy Tabs v 5.1. One of the most common request is to have more branding options (colors, hover effects, etc.). I already made a leap forward between v4 and v5.0, and I hope to bring some more improvements soon. I already published an example of custom style (including a live demo), but the release of Internet Explorer 9 changes the game (for example IE 9 natively supports rounded corners, no need for workarounds).

In March, I spoke at the San Diego SharePoint User Group. After I clean up my slides, I’ll post them, along with some interesting Q&As from the session.

I also have a couple projects with my new company, User Managed Solutions LLC. In particular I am working on a new online training offer for this Fall – more details coming in May!

Last, but not least, I am honored to welcome guest blogger Trudy Hutzler for a series on creating a “school site”. Trudy is a Senior Technical Architect for AT&T Hosting and Application Management, and a contributing author for the Mastering SharePoint Foundation 2010 book. As this blog is user focused, she is not going to talk about her experience on SharePoint 2010 migrations, but about a custom site she built for her daughter who attends school online. Stay tuned!

Don’t take my solutions at face value!

Last week, I stumbled upon this comment on Twitter:

“I have used and love easy tabs, but I do need pretty on my current engagement”

What? Not pretty, my Easy Tabs? Let me set the record straight.

First, let’s make sure we are on the same page. The current version of the Easy Tabs is v5, compatible with both SharePoint 2007 and SharePoint 2010. You can build your own here:
http://sp2010.pathtosharepoint.com/SharePoint-User-Toolkit/Pages/Easy-Tabs-v5.aspx

By default, the form offers two styles: one taken from SP 2007, and the other taken from SP 2010. Note that both options work on both SharePoint versions (for example, you can pick the SP 2007 style for your SP 2010 site).

You don’t like the colors? Well, talk to Microsoft! I did not invent the styles, I am reusing the default ones you get when you create a team site. The significant advantage here is that you don’t have any external dependency, just add the Web Part to a page and it ‘ll work.

If you want other colors, feel free to pick your own. Click on the “Modify colors” option, and you’ll be presented with a color picker, allowing you to choose your own background and font colors.

Not satisfied yet? Well, you can take it one step further. Look at the Easy Tabs code, and you’ll see that it is made of two independent parts: the stylesheet (style tag) and the tab builder (script tag). Modify the stylesheet as you please to get the final look. As an example, I have built this demo that has it all (rounded corners, hover effects, gradient):
http://sp2010.pathtosharepoint.com/Portfolio/Pages/Styled-Easy-Tabs.aspx

The purpose of the SharePoint User Toolkit is to open the door to advanced designs. Don’t see these tools as final products, but rather as a startpoint to build your own solutions. The beauty of such “User Managed Solutions” is that you have full control on them, and can tweak them to fit your specific needs. I took the Easy Tabs as example, but I could have chosen the image rotator, or other solutions from the toolkit.

If you are interested, I’ll start offering in a couple weeks a new series of online workshops, where I’ll show how to make the most of these tools. Feel free to contact me now if you have specific needs.

If you are a Web designer, or a SharePoint pro, looking for solutions for your customers, I have many other tools in my drawers. Come talk to me about your requirements, and let’s start a collaboration! We can also discuss this on LinkedIn, in the SharePoint User Managed Solutions group. And if you are in San Diego, or the Bay Area, I’ll be there in a couple weeks and we can meet in person.

My solutions spotted in the blogosphere

My solutions for SharePoint end users are regularly relayed on forums, twitter and SharePoint blogs. The past two months have been particularly active, and I have identified 15 posts that mention Path to SharePoint. I am listing them below, some of them are definitely worth a look.

The SharePoint User Toolkit

The SharePoint User Toolkit: a first step toward advanced SharePoint customization
Get the Point is the official blog of the Microsoft SharePoint End-User Content Team. This article written by me describes the main solutions currently available in the Toolkit, and what’ s special about each. Big thanks to Renée Smith for giving me this opportunity to spread the word!

http://sbelskiy.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!BB6AC8CA5EB9828E!4455.entry?wa=wsignin1.0&sa=88791362
In Russian, a review of the solutions available in the Toolkit.

The Easy Tabs

The popular Easy Tabs have seen a new release compatible with SP 2010 this Summer.

Easy Tabs Rock – v5 Beta is looking really good
A very well written post, by SharePoint MVP Sean Wallbridge, with lots of screenshots – definitely worth checking out! Note that v5 beta has since become the official v5.

Use Easy Tabs 5.0 to consolidate lists, Web Parts, and calendars
Obviously Renée Smith thinks that Sean’s explanations are better than mine. Oh well, she is right!

SharePoint filtering with web part connections
The Easy Tabs in context: Kerri Abraham shows how to combine Web Part connections and Easy Tabs to make content more accessible. A very useful post!

Using EasyTabs with Filtered DVWPs to Make Data Manageable
Another example from EndUserSharePoint.com, by Jim Bob Howard, where filtering and Easy Tabs combine for better readability. Note that the post is actually part of a long series on the Data View Web Part.

The HTML Calculated Column

KPI’s without SharePoint Enterprise (on a budget)
A review of KPI options for SharePoint if you don’t have MOSS Enterprise.

How to create a Gantt chart in SharePoint
Two years ago, I showed how to build simple Gantt charts using the HTML Calculated Column. Linda Chapman describes a more complete solution in her post.
This week, Ben Schlaepfer left a comment on my blog about another solution using the same method (Ben, we are looking forward to your article!).

HTML in een berekende kolom
The HTML Calculated Column explained in Dutch by Gene Vangampelaere.

http://vipnetty.wordpress.com/2010/09/03/sharepoint_list_color/
Another translation, this time in Thai (?).

Item id in display and edit form

Showing the records id on the view and edit forms
A jQuery script, by Ryan Wheeler, who only discovered afterwards the JavaScript version I wrote 18 months ago.

Other

SharePoint Kaffeetasse
SharePoint MVP Michael Greth regularly mentions my solutions in his daily SharePoint Kaffeetasse. Last time he did was… today, about my Print Preview bookmarklet.

SharePoint 2010: Recopilatorio de enlaces interesantes
Juan Carlos González Martín regularly publishes compilations of interesting SharePoint links.

http://idubbs.com/blog/?p=241
Gathered by Wes Preston, a list of useful SharePoint links, including the SharePoint User Toolkit.

http://www.janecerdenola.com/?p=86
A mention of my solutions, as workaround when you don’t have server access.

A new location for the SharePoint User’s Toolkit

The SharePoint User’s Toolkit has a new official page:
http://sp2010.pathtosharepoint.com/SharePoint-User-Toolkit/

The old location will remain active but won’t be updated anymore.

The new site is based on SharePoint 2010 and hosted by fpweb.net. Thanks to the support of fpweb.net, I expect the new site to be more reliable and offer a better user experience.

The SharePoint User’s Toolkit is a collection of tools designed to help end users build advanced customizations. It includes for example the Easy Tabs and an Image Rotator. It will continue to grow, with new tools added every month.

Regular users of the Toolkit will notice that several solutions are not in beta anymore. I haven’t actually made any changes to the code, the beta versions are becoming official simply because no issue was reported in the past few months.

Easy Tabs: Even Better with Print Friendly!

Author: Kerri Abraham, Revenue Cycle Sharepoint Coordinator, Mercy Medical Center.

Several months back I was tasked with a training build for our highest turnover position.   The main function of the job was a 7 screen registration process, and because of government regulation and business requirements, every field on these 7 screens needed thorough instructions.  The information I was to work from was half a paper ream thick as hard copy!  First step was a severe edit of the information and then solid structuring to make it useable to staff.  My thoughts went right to the Easy Tabs!

I started with organizing according to the 7 screen requirements, and soon realized that wouldn’t be enough, staff might still be overwhelmed with content.  Taking advantage of the natural breaks in the process it broke out a bit further, until finally that half ream of hard copy was just 17 wiki pages of instructions.  Using the Blog to Wiki publishing technique, I utilized a color coding strategy to keep the look consistent across all the pages and links at the bottom of each page moved staff through the steps.  Initially the trainer can walk new hires through the process using these handy links, but shuffling through the links to find the spot they are caught on (while the customer stands waiting) is unrealistic.  That problem was resolved with the Easy Tabs

By modifying the view of the wiki content and filtering it on ID, then adding them one after the other on the page, changing each of the web part’s titles to reflect the contents, and then implementing Christophe’s Easy Tab solution I was able to get all 17 pages of information neatly tucked up under each other on the page.  Keep in mind that the native content of the wiki does not roll up under the tabs, that gives the display as below.

This worked out perfectly, staff could keep this page up as they worked, if they were stuck on a step in the process, they could click the tab and immediately find their information.   When I sent a picture of my use of Easy Tabs to Christophe, he suggested that I add the Expand All tab, but call it ‘Printer Friendly’, as a way to appeal to  the trainer’s needs who was really impressed with the wiki, but still  attached to hard copy.  Up to this point she was printing each page separately because without page breaks the information was confusing the way it ran together.  Easy Tabs v5 completely solves that issue with ‘Printer Friendly’ plus page breaks.  Now this documentation prints just like a procedure manual.  The trainer is thrilled with the results!

I can offer a few tips for creating this kind of procedure manual with the wiki:  use the Advanced Web Parts gallery to quickly add multiple web parts.

The default display under native wiki content is ‘no Title’, so ‘Appearance’ on each addition will need to be adjusted to display as tab.  Note the only columns checked to display are Wiki Content and Edit.  Filter wiki content on ID.   Consider adding the column of ID to the Wiki Pages/All Pages view of the library to make it easier to identify ID.  The rest is simply a matter of perseverance in repeating the steps and setting the toolbar displays to none for a nice clean look.

I have a feeling this is only the beginning…  A comment Dux Raymond Sy recently made in a video recording about “printing a project plan” got me thinking.  I am a fan of Dux, so I’ve been using Sharepoint for project management for quite some time, but “printing a project plan” suddenly struck a new cord!  So I went to work rebuilding my project site template to include Christophe’s Easy Tabs, and while I was at it, I incorporated some color coding into the task list as well.  I restructured all the lists and libraries on a Web Part page.  In addition to the standard lists, again I utilize a wiki library, exposing just the content field, which is part of the site template and includes several project related forms that provide the project managers with an easy to edit alternative to Word documents (and now even more printer friendly under the tabs.)  The results were dramatic especially since I used the new color options with Easy Tabs v5!  

Now the project managers can quickly print off just the Web Parts they need, or the entire project documentation with just a few clicks.  Maybe regular hard copy reports are needed to communicate at Shareholder meetings?  Create a web part page just for report out, adding the desired web parts with list views and dashboards that can be tucked under Easy Tabs and printed in a moment’s notice.

I have number of other ideas in the works for these tabs as well, meeting minutes and agendas with easy printability, printable lists displayed in “Preview Pane” style, a telephone directory based off a contact list built with Easy Tabs v5, why, I’m just getting warmed up!

I think the new options make an already great solution into an awesome feature. What do you think? Someone recently told me “Printing web parts kind of goes against the purpose of electronic data capture doesn’t it?” Help me prove them wrong. There are countless uses for print friendly! I’ve listed out my ideas, now it is your turn, how are you using the Easy Tabs?